term for a pile of ropes on a ship deck

glossary of nautical terms

a waterborne vehicle smaller than a ship. one definition is a small craft carried aboard a ship. a group of piles driven close together and bound with wire cables into a single structure. a rope ladder, lowered from the deck, as when pilots or passengers come aboard. jetty. a structure, usually masonry, projecting out from the shore; a

maritime terms and definitions

keel-haul: to tie a rope about a man and, after passing the rope under the ship and bringing it up on deck on the opposite side, haul away, dragging the man down and around the keel of the vessel. as the bottom of the ship was always covered with sharp barnacles, this was a severe punishment used aboard sailing ships long ago.

anchor terminology used in shipping

anchor terminology used in shipping. open hawse: when both anchors are out and the cables lead broad out on their own bows. a vessel lying moored to anchors ahead and astern is at open hawse when she lies across the line of her anchors. range cable: to lay out the cable on deck, or a wharf, or in a drydock, etc.

word list: definitions of nautical terms and ship parts

stairs from upper deck of ship to lower deck cordage ropes in the rigging of a ship cringle loop at corner of sail to which a line is attached crosstrees horizontal crosspieces at a masthead used to support ship's mast davit device for hoisting and lowering a boat deadeye rounded wooden block with hole used to set up ship's stays

illustrated glossary of ship and boat terms

a general term for ropes and cables. counter fig. g-14 . technically, the transverse section between the bottom of the stern and the wing transom. however, many documents and dings refer to the counter as the entire transverse area between the top of the sternpost and the rail or taffrail. counter timbers figs. g-14a g-14c . vertical timbers framing the counter.

rope coil for ship deck

rope coil for ship deck. coil the string using the sticky side up to hold it in place, coil string to desired length and cut the end off. spray string with ca kicker. use a small amount of ca to hold all the string together. the kicker will cause the ca to dry quickly and not saturate the string.

nautical slang in common usage

know the ropes - this is pretty obvious if youve ever seen a tall ship. it was such an important skill on sailing vessels that an honourable discharge from service was marked, at one time, with the term knows the ropes. land-side it still means a person with experience and skill. also, learn the ropes and show them the ropes.

naval terms--a coil of rope on deck--what's it called

the bell rope. ships have lines and when a line is coiled as you describe, the term is flemishing the line is still called by what it is so you would would hear the captain order the deck hands to 'flemish up that main sheet, rigging line, jib sheet etc. and i didn't have to look this up on some web site

boating basics glossary of terms

gangway the area of a ships side where people board and disembark. gear a general term for ropes, blocks, tackle and other equipment. give-way vessel a term used to describe the vessel which must yield in meeting, crossing, or overtaking situations.

esws deck fundamentals flashcards quizlet

esws deck fundamentals. line with sound powered phone line attached to provide bridge to bridge voice comms. colored flags are located every 20 feet to allow the conning officer to determine the distance between ships. chem lights are used at night. known as the p and d or t and d line. hand tended.

pier and dock rope rails

selecting rope to be used as a hand rail on a dock or pier isnt like choosing a product to be used as a visual barrier or decorative fence or landscaping element. for these decorative applications, natural fiber manila is an appropriate choice.

maritime dictionary officer of the watch

to tie a rope about a man and, after passing the rope under the ship and bringing it up on deck on the opposite side, haul away, dragging the man down and around the keel of the vessel. as the bottom of the ship was always covered with sharp barnacles, this was a severe punishment used aboard sailing ships long ago.

sailing terms

pile a wood, metal or concrete pole driven into the bottom. craft may be made fast to a pile; it may be used to support a pier see piling or a float. piling support, protection for wharves, piers etc.; constructed of piles see pile pilothouse a small cabin on the deck of the ship that protects the steering wheel and the crewman steering.

nautical terms origin yacht terminology and phrases

the nautical term head derives from sailing ships in which the toilet area for crew was at the head area or bow of the ship. the toilets were placed there because ships were powered by wind, and since sailing vessels can not sail directly into the wind, this placed the toilets downwind most of the time.also the upper corner of a triangular sail.

naval terminology l-z

larboard side the left hand side of a vessel. this old-time name for the modern 'port' means literally the 'loading' side. ancient ships were steered by a huge oar secured near the stern, on the starboard or right-hand side. in order to keep the steering oar from being crushed against the side of the dock,

navy terminology, origins of

the 'head' aboard a navy ship is the bathroom. the term comes from the days of sailing ships when the place for the crew to relieve themselves was all the way forward on either side of the

free unfinished flashcards about nautical words

free flashcards to help memorize facts about nautical words. other activities to help include hangman, crossword, word scramble, games, matching, quizes, and tests. stairs from upper deck of ship to lower deck: cordage: ropes in the rigging of a ship constructed of piles see pile bitter end: the last part of a rope or chain.the

how to tie down a boat to a dock gone outdoors your

how to tie down a boat to a dock the bow line is the line from the deck cleat thats almost at the bow. it angles away from, and forward of, the boats bow. they collapse into a pile of plastic fibers. when using nylon or natural fiber dock lines, never stand in line with a dock line that's secured to both your boat and the dock

glossary of nautical terms

1. a post or pair mounted on the ship's bow, for fastening ropes or cables 2. strong vertical timbers or irons fastened through the deck beams used for securing ropes or hawsers bit heads the tops of two massive timbers that support the windlass on a sailing barge bitter end the last part or loose end of a rope or cable.

nautical terminology flashcards quizlet

one definition is a small craft carried aboard a ship. boat hook a short shaft with a fitting at one end shaped to facilitate use in putting a line over a piling, recovering an object dropped overboard, or in pushing or fending off.

boat terminology and nautical terms boats online

jacobs ladder - a rope ladder, lowered from the deck, as when pilots or passengers come aboard. jetsam - debris ejected from a ship that sinks or washes ashore. see also flotsam .

anchor terminology used in shipping

clear hawse: this term means that the cables are clear of one another when a ship is riding to two anchors. clear anchor : the anchor is reported clear or foul as soon as it is entirely sighted. to be clear the anchor must be hanging from its ring and clear of its own cable and of any obstruction such as a bight of the rope or chain picked up from the bottom.

naval terminology a-k

the structures have disappeared, but the term forecastle remains; refers to upper deck in forward part of ship. abbreviated fo'c'sle. 2 this name is a relic of the days when huge wooden castles actually were built on the fore and aft ends of ships from which fighting men could throw spears, arrows, stones, etc., onto the decks of an enemy.

boat line definitions and marine application guide

line is a nautical term used to describe a length of rope used for marine and boating purposes. mooring line is a nautical term used to describe a length of rope i.e. a line used to moor connect / fasten / make fast a marine vessel to dock, pile, wharf, buoy field, the shoreline, lake bottom, and or sea bottom.

what's the proper name for those bollards that you tie

when they are on a ship's deck as opposed to a dock , they can alo be called timberheads as they used to be the tops of timbers and there is a similarly formed racist name for them, as well. i have heard the term extended to the shore-mounted ones, although i do not know how widespread that usage may be.

glossary

pile - a wood, metal or concrete pole driven into the bottom. craft may be made fast to a pile; it may be used to support a pier see piling or a float. piling - support, protection for wharves, piers etc.; constructed of piles see pile pilothouse - a small cabin on the deck of the ship that protects the steering wheel and the crewman steering.

mooring

pile moorings. mooring is often accomplished using thick ropes called mooring lines or hawsers. the lines are fixed to deck fittings on the vessel at one end and to fittings such as bollards, rings, and cleats on the other end. mooring requires cooperation between people on a pier and on a vessel.

boat terminology and nautical terms boats online

bilge - the compartment at the bottom of the hull of a ship or boat where water collects and must be pumped out of the vessel. bitter end - the last part or loose end of a rope or cable. the inboard end of the anchor rode. boat - a very broad term for a waterborne vehicle smaller than a ship.